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Investment Strategies to Learn Before Starting Stock Trading

17 May 2022

Many individuals believe that investing is only for the wealthy and some even consider it to be the same as gambling. You might only ever experience the thrill of investing after making your first stock purchase. Mutual funds have continued to remain the only means for new players to obtain exposure in equity and although mutual funds provide diversity, specialist management, versatility, and other benefits, there is another component that is more rewarding and that is investing in Individual Stocks. Individual Stock purchases are more rewarding as they offer considerably higher rates of return than mutual funds.

In this blog, we have compiled a list of some key Stock Investment Strategies and Investing Techniques that you should know about.

Now you might be wondering what Investment Strategies exactly means and the answer to that is a very straightforward one. A set of rules that guide and influence investment decisions are known as investment strategies and yes, they are different from investment goals. These stock investment strategies are the roads that will lead you towards your investment goals and because of their flexibility, you can choose from a variety of options based on your risk tolerance, investing aesthetic, financial objectives, and capital availability.

You can certainly change your mind if an option doesn’t compliment your risk appetite or agenda. Changing investment strategies, on the other hand, has a cost. Buying and selling securities, especially in non-sheltered accounts in the short term, can lead to tax-related circumstances and you may only realize that your portfolio is riskier than you thought after your investments lose their value.  

Listed below are some popular investing techniques that can be used by almost every person, and knowing and understanding the differences between them might help you in picking an option that is most suitable for you in the long run without having to change your course.

Some Useful Stock Investment Strategies

  • Value Investing

Opting for stocks that appear to be trading for less than their intrinsic or book value is referred to as Value Investing. In this, investors deliberately seek out stocks that they believe the market undervalues. These investors consider that the market exaggeratedly reacts to both positive and negative news, leading to stock price activities that are out of line with an organization’s ultimate principles. The exaggerated reaction presents a chance to profit by purchasing stocks at reduced prices. Investors who want to preserve their securities for a long time should mostly consider Value Investing. If you invest in value companies, their businesses may take a couple of years to scale. Value Investing is concerned with a far-reaching master plan and frequently tries to regard investing with something like a “slow but steady” growth mindset.

  • Growth Investing

This is an investment option and tactic that aims to increase the equity or capital of their investors; thus, these investors prefer investing in ‘growth stocks’, which are usually fresh, small businesses that are expected to flourish at a pace that is faster than those in a similar sector, industry, and market as them. Growth Investing involves more risk than most investment options for it works only under particular economic and market circumstances. This investment option is highly suitable for investors seeking shorter investment scopes and significantly higher capacity than value investing. Investors who aren’t particularly worried about continuous investment profitability and dividend income could perhaps consider this investing option.

  • Momentum Investing

Momentum Investing is an approach that seeks to purchase stocks that are trending skywards or relatively brief securities that are trending earthwards. Momentum Investing is the practice of trading assets based on the latest market patterns and is based on the idea that when a price shift gains sufficient momentum, it will persist in the same uniform path. So, if the price of an asset rises, market participants become more interested in it, thrusting the market rate even higher. Momentum investors usually go with the flow. They claim that champions should continue to win and losers should continue to lose. They seek out stocks that are on the rise. Market makers who follow a momentum strategy must always be on the lookout for opportunities to buy and sell.

  • Dollar-Cost Averaging

Dollar-Cost Averaging is an investment plan wherein an investor splits the total value to be invested across regular intervals of purchases of a certain asset in order to effectively reduce the effect of volatility and fluctuation. Purchases are made at frequent intervals regardless of the asset’s price. DCA is also a tool that investors can use to accumulate income and savings over time. It also allows an investor to counteract relatively brief price movements in the wider stock market.

Various Methods To Use to Analyze Stocks –

  • Fundamental Analysis – Buying Value

Fundamental analysis is related to business. When you buy a stock in a company, you are technically purchasing a portion of the company, according to the investing community. As a result, the logical question is, how do you determine the value of the portion you are purchasing? Would you pay any amount at random for the proposition you want to buy? No, it does not. You must calculate the proportion and then decide whether or not to purchase. Fundamental analysis is the process of arriving at a business valuation.

  • Quantitative Analysis – Buying Numbers

Quantitative analysis is solely concerned with numbers and has no bearing on the company’s operations. Even fundamental analysis necessitates numerical inputs, but the primary emphasis remains on qualitative factors such as management expertise, competition intensity, market opportunity, substitution, and so on. A quantitative analyst considers these factors to be supportive subjective judgment rather than the primary driver of buy/sell decisions. With the advancement of technology, number crunching is now primarily done using computers and tools, and quants (as analysts are commonly referred to) have begun to use only buy/sell signals based on a quantitative basis, with no regard for management or actual business.

  • Screen-Based Investing

To finalize investments, quant analysts use “screens.” The screen looks for patterns and throws companies that meet those criteria. Screens can look for a variety of factors about a company’s operations or stocks. Screens are also commonly used to generate ideas and then apply fundamental analysis or technical analysis models to each of the names before making a final decision. According to investors, using a screen removes emotions from the investing process.

  • CAN SLIM

It is a stock selection method devised by Investor’s Business Daily’s founder William J. O’Neil. It is a combination of quantitative and technical analysis.

  •   The letters “C” and “A” indicate that current and annual earnings are increasing.
  •   “N” denotes new products/markets/management;
  •   “S” denotes small capitalization and high-volume demand;
  •   “L” denotes leader or laggard (at the discretion of the investor);
  •   “I” denotes institutional sponsorship; and
  •   “M” denotes market direction.
  • Technical Analysis – Buying the Pattern

Technical analysis is entirely based on charts. No one would have an advantage over anyone else if the market was efficient and all information about a company was available publicly at all times and instantly. However, this scenario is not feasible. This leads to technical analysis, in which an investor focuses on psychological data and charts out a pattern. Charts, according to investors, frequently provide insight into the psychology surrounding a stock, and trends in the chart can give rise to buy and sell signals.

You may also want to read How to Invest in Share Market

Conclusion

You might probably be happy reading about different stock investment strategies, but chances are, like any other investor, you’ll find some approach that fits your needs and style based on your risk tolerance. Furthermore, investing is a never-ending process that is constantly evolving. As a result, you will need to develop an investing philosophy that suits you while meeting your objectives and minimizing your risks.

Disclaimer

The stocks mentioned in this article are not recommendations. Please conduct your own research and due diligence before investing. Investment in securities market are subject to market risks, read all the related documents carefully before investing. Please read the Risk Disclosure documents carefully before investing in Equity Shares, Derivatives, Mutual fund, and/or other instruments traded on the Stock Exchanges. As investments are subject to market risks and price fluctuation risk, there is no assurance or guarantee that the investment objectives shall be achieved. NBT do not guarantee any assured returns on any investments. Past performance of securities/instruments is not indicative of their future performance.
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