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Adjusted Closing Price

The adjusted closing price is the closing price after dividend payouts, stock splits, or the issue of additional shares have been taken into account. The adjusted closing price of a company gives you a more accurate indication of the stock's value than the closing price, which shows you how much investors paid for shares at the end of a trading day

What is the Adjusted Closing Price?

Stock values have been stated in terms of the closing price and the adjusted closing price. The closing price is the raw price. Here it means just the cash value of the last transacted price before the market closes. The adjusted closing price is attributed to anything that would affect the stock price after the market closes for the day. 

A stock price is typically affected by the supply and demand of the market members. Some corporate actions - like stock splits, dividends, and right offering affect a stock's price. Adjustments would allow investors to get an accurate record of the stock's price. Adjustments would allow the investor to get an accurate record of the stock's performance. 

Investors need to understand how the corporate actions are accounted for in the stock's adjusted closing price. It is especially important during the examination of historical returns as it gives analysts an accurate representation of the firm's equity value. 

Adjusted Closing Price of Stock - Explained

Mostly, the closing price and adjusted closing price would be the same for the trading day. When particular events happen, like the substantial dividend or the stock split, these numbers would vary. Here is the adjusted closing price formula or stock split:

1) Dividend Payments:

Dividends are payments made to shareholders when a company's stock and profits are increasing. A dividend might be paid in the form of extra shares or cash payments. While dividends are beneficial to shareholders, they reduce the value of each company's stock.


The reduction is because of the fact that paying dividends diminishes the value of the firm because it transfers money or shares to shareholders rather than putting them back into the business. The adjusted closing price, unlike the closing price, represents depreciation due to dividend distribution.

2) New Offerings:

In order to determine an adjusted value, the adjusted closing price considers dividends, stock splits, and new stock offerings. The adjusted closing price represents the change in stock value as a result of the corporation's new offerings. When a company decides to offer more shares of stock, it's called a new offering, and it's usually done to raise money. 


These new offers might be made as a rights offering, in which current shareholders have first dibs on discounted shares, or they could be made available to the general public.


Since there are more individual shares, each share represents a lower portion of the total value; new issues reduce the value of the existing stock. This means that, even if a stock closes at 50 per share, if the corporation has issued new stock, each stock may only be worth 40 depending on the number of new stock offers. The adjusted closing price, rather than the cash value of the stock at the end of the day, accounts for the new offerings and the associated devaluation of each individual share.

3) Stock Splits

Companies can split stocks into smaller pieces when individual equities become too pricey. Because the number of total shares increases, these splits, like new offerings, diminish the overall value of each share. While a stock split reduces the overall value of each individual share, it can actually raise the overall worth of the company as new investors rush to buy the newly decreased equities, driving up the price.

How to Calculate Adjusted Closing Price?

Splits, dividends, and right issues all have distinct ways of calculating Adjusted Closing Price, which has a varied effect.

If X Ltd. declares a dividend of Rs. 2 per share and is trading at Rs. 200, the Adjusted Closing Price will be Rs. 198.

The Adjusted Closing Price either falls or rises dramatically when equities are split. If a firm decides to split its stock in a 2:1 ratio and the stock price is Rs. 100, the new Adjusted Closing Price will be Rs. 50, and the total number of outstanding shares in the Market would double while the market capitalization remains the same. 

When the right shares are offered, the Market's supply is diluted. The Adjusted Closing Price will be decreased as a result of this.

Advantages of Adjusted Closing Price

The following are some of the major benefits of using the Adjusted Closing Price:

  • Adjusted closing prices make it very simple to conduct a complete analysis of stock prices. Investors can rapidly assess the value they would derive from a specific stock.
  • Since the price compensates for the profitability of value-added stocks and dividend growth, the adjusted closing price functions as a whetting stone for comparing two stock prices; furthermore, it is always a good idea to compare two asset classes for adjusted closing prices before investing in long-term assets. It is quite beneficial in determining the appropriate asset allocation.

Adjusted Closing Price - FAQs

Q1. What is a reasonable price?

The final price where the security is traded during a standard trading day is the closing price. The closing price of an asset is the usual benchmark that investors use to track its performance over time.

Q2. What is the formula for calculating monthly return using adjusted close price?

To calculate a monthly stock return, you must compare the current month's closing price to the prior month's closing price. Divide the current month's price by the previous month's price to get the percentage return formula.

Q3. Should I use the adjusted close price or the closure price?

While the closing price simply refers to the cost of shares at the end of the day, the adjusted closing price takes dividends, stock splits, and new stock offerings into account. The adjusted closing price is a more accurate indicator of stock value since it starts where the closing price finishes.

Q4. Why are dividends factored into stock prices?

The cause for the change is that the money given out in dividends no longer belongs to the company, which is represented in a lower market capitalization. It is instead owned by the individual stockholders.

Q5. What is the difference between the last and the current price?

The stock price that you see when the Market is open is the Last Traded Price, whereas - the stock price that you see when the Market closes is the Closing Price.

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